menu

Children and the Data Cycle: Rights and Ethics in a Big Data World

August 22, 2017 by Gabrielle Berman, Kerry Albright

Access this Publication
In an era of increasing dependence on data science and big data, the voices of one set of major stakeholders - the world's children and those who advocate on their behalf - have been largely absent. A recent paper estimates one in three global internet users is a child, yet there has be little rigorous debate or understanding of how to adapt traditional, offline ethical standards for research involving data collection from children, to a big data, online environment (Livingstone et al., 2015). This paper argues that due to the potential for severe, long-lasting and differential impacts on children, child reights need to be firmly integrated onto the agendas of global debates about ethics and data science. The authors outline their rationale for a greater focus on child rights and ethics in data science and suggest steps to move forward, focusing on the various actors within the data chain including data generators, collectors, analysts and end-users. It concludes by calling for a much stronger appreciation of the links between child rights, ethics and data science disciplines and for enhanced discourse between stakeholders in the data chain, and those responsible for upholding the rights of children, globally.